Cross-Currents gathering a great success!

How can art, agriculture and rural economic development support and contribute to each other? That’s just what participants in last week’s event Cross-Currents: Art + Agriculture Powering Rural Economies gathered to find out. The event was held in Greensboro, NC on September 3-5, 2014 and was sponsored by Art-Force and the National Rural Assembly.’

 Perhaps the first event of its kind, Cross-Currents sought to look at often unexplored partnerships in art and agriculture, and participants rose to the challenge, launching into collaborative discussions from the first minutes together. The event brought participants from as far away as Canada and Puerto Rico and representing 22 states and the District of Columbia.  The conference was keynoted by Robin Rather, who challenged participants to think about rural communities in new ways. Other presentation topics included agritourism, new ways to build local food systems, many exciting local art/ag projects, policy considerations, and more. Participants also toured a local farm, a farmer’s market, and an art studio, and had a locavore lunch with renowned local chef Jay Pierce.  Common themes that emerged during this event were community building, relationships, partnerships, and creative placemaking.  At the end of the event, everyone was energized by the possibilities of partnerships in art and agriculture and the difference these projects might make in helping make our rural communities more dynamic and successful. We heard many ideas for future projects and collaborations that bubbled up during our three days together. Truly, a cross-disciplinary approach to rural community development holds more potential than we can imagine.   More information about this event, including presentation materials that were shared and related resources, is available here.
Perhaps the first event of its kind, Cross-Currents sought to look at often unexplored partnerships in art and agriculture, and participants rose to the challenge, launching into collaborative discussions from the first minutes together. The event brought participants from as far away as Canada and Puerto Rico and representing 22 states and the District of Columbia. The conference was keynoted by Robin Rather, who challenged participants to think about rural communities in new ways. Other presentation topics included agritourism, new ways to build local food systems, many exciting local art/ag projects, policy considerations, and more. Participants also toured a local farm, a farmer’s market, and an art studio, and had a locavore lunch with renowned local chef Jay Pierce. Common themes that emerged during this event were community building, relationships, partnerships, and creative placemaking. At the end of the event, everyone was energized by the possibilities of partnerships in art and agriculture and the difference these projects might make in helping make our rural communities more dynamic and successful. We heard many ideas for future projects and collaborations that bubbled up during our three days together. Truly, a cross-disciplinary approach to rural community development holds more potential than we can imagine. More information about this event, including presentation materials that were shared and related resources, is available here.

Rio Grande reflections

Taneum Fotheringill shares her reflections on traveling to the Rio Grande Valley in South Texas — and how it changed her understanding of a region often misunderstood by outsiders.

Read More »
clipboard with stethoscope

A new series from the Rural Assembly to explore health disparities in rural communities​

The Rural Assembly is kicking off a series of blog posts which will explore the challenges faced by rural citizens with chronic health conditions, the consequences of limited healthcare access, and the urgent need for comprehensive solutions to bridge this healthcare gap. By addressing the unique challenges faced by these individuals, we can work towards building a healthcare system that is inclusive, efficient, and responsive to the diverse needs of all citizens. Bridging the healthcare gap is not just a matter of policy: it is a commitment to the well-being and dignity of every individual, regardless of where they call home.

Read More »

Drawing Resilience: Autumn Cavender

Wicanhpi Iyotan Win (Autumn Cavender) is Wahpetunwan Dakota and a midwife from Pezihutazizi K’api Makoca (Upper Sioux Community). Autumn is finding new ways to see, visualize and encode designs using traditional Dakota aesthetic and design processes. Her current practice explores quillwork Dakota methodology and its applications through ancestral, digital, and generative technologies.

Read More »